The Finished Product (mostly)

This is my final prototype.  I lowered the front edge of the front fenders a little.  I am unhappy with the window texture.  They are just to bright.  I am thinking a glass texture with a brown tint would be better.  Anyway, here are a few shots.  Included in one of the shots is a Kubelwagen by “Rawen” for size comparison.  It was a 1:100 scale model resized to 1:72 scale.  It comes with a Tiger I as well.  My son will be happy when I finally get that built.

Side/Rear shot to show off the rear "fenders". I simply added a circular strip of 67 lbs paper that was slightly larger than the wheel well. I've included 4 in the model just in case one gets messed up.

Side/Rear shot to show off the rear “fenders”. I simply added a circular strip of 67 lbs paper that was slightly larger than the wheel well. I’ve included 4 in the model just in case one gets messed up.

Front shot showing off the lowered front fender edges as well as the front bumper and windshield. I am not happy with the glass color.

Front shot showing off the lowered front fender edges as well as the front bumper and windshield. I am not happy with the glass color.

Overhead to show the basic interior print I added. Surprisingly effective with out much fuss. The roof will be permanently glues on.

Overhead to show the basic interior print I added. Surprisingly effective with out much fuss. The roof will be permanently glues on.

The axles are just 1" lengths of florist wire. Rough them up before gluing. I think the wire is about 20 gauge.

The axles are just 1″ lengths of florist wire. Rough them up before gluing. I think the wire is about 20 gauge.

Side by side with a quick build Kubelwagon by "Rawen."

Side by side with a quick build Kubelwagon by “Rawen.”

You can get the final model in jpg on the “Old School” page on this blog.

Quick notes: Cut out all of the black areas and discard.  The rear fenders make sure you do the black areas out first and then the outer edge.  I found it easier to cut the rear fenders with a knife being careful to leave enough paper to hold the piece in place.  Use 65-67 pound paper.  Some of the lines are not meant to be cut!  Print out at 85ppi for the correct scaling.

If you are new to card modeling, check out www.papermodelers.com.  Wonderful site full of very helpful folks!

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One Response to The Finished Product (mostly)

  1. Dale Hurtt says:

    Those are really great. Great crafting. Paper models can be hard to execute sometimes.

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